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“In Lead, you never really know what you’re going to get,” locals dig out after snowstorm

Published: Oct. 14, 2021 at 7:22 PM CDT
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RAPID CITY, S.D. (KOTA) - Some places in the Northern Hills got upwards to two feet of snow, and now it’s time for people to deal with it.

“In Lead, you never really know what you’re going to get,” says Lead local, Ki Caserio.

He says no matter what you get, when you get it and look out the window in morning it’s time to “get up and get to shoveling.”

This time around, there’s a lot to get through and Ki’s glad he doesn’t find himself counting each scoop, because, he says, “I don’t think I can count that high. It’s part of living here. You know, we need the moisture, it’s just too bad it’s so heavy. Thank God for snow blowers.”

One alright thing does come out of it, though. He adds it’s “good excerise,” and despite the workout he doesn’t simply quit once he’s finished shoveling.

“I try and help the neighbors. I learned that from my Dad. You help your neighbors and they help you.”

When it seems like you’re looking at a mountain of snow on your driveway or on your sidewalks, and it’s heavy, it can be a real challenge for some people to get through it all, like Rodger Asheim, who’s been living in Lead for 73 years.

“It’s kind of hard on a person with Congestive Heart Failure. I got it 3 years ago. I’ve got to take a lot of breaks. I can tell when my heart starts fluttering. When it gets fluttering real bad I go in and lay down,” says Asheim.

Rodger is in his mid 70′s and still tackles the snow despite the risk, because he says he’s “not scared to die. That’s why I come out here and shovel. A lot of people don’t shovel that are my age, because some people have died. The snow is good exercise as long as you know when to quit.”

Plus, sometimes quitting isn’t so bad, because Asheim says it’s a “one way ticket home.”

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