Surgical Options - KOTA Territory News

Surgical Options

If you have a serious back or neck problem that may require surgery, you will want to become well informed about the type of surgery to be done, and what will be involved in recovery after surgery. The Spine Center has developed a comprehensive guide to the most common spine pain treatment procedures.

Additionally, The Spine Center has a patient information booklet which goes into great depth on various surgeries. To request a copy of the patient booklet, contact us, or call the medical advice nurse at The Spine Center.

Making choices about your health can often be difficult. This Internet site to help you make an educated decision about your health care. Please carefully read the material provided and visit with our staff regarding your questions or concerns. If you and your physician decide that surgery is the best option, bring your patient handbook with you to surgery, as well as to your follow-up office visits. Your spine physician will be able to illustrate the procedure involved.

In the handbook, you will find information on the causes of spine pain, and information pertaining to each specific procedure performed, including how to prepare for surgery.

Learn more about different surgical options by reading below.

Minimally Invasive Surgery

With the objective of least interruption to the patient's regular, active lifestyle, minimally invasive surgical techniques provide the opportunity to successfully treat back problems. These surgical methods have achieved results similar to those of conventional "open surgery." A smaller incision is made, sometimes only a half-inch in length. The surgeon inserts special surgical instruments through these tiny incisions and probes in order to access the damaged disc in the spine. Entry and repair to the damaged disc or vertebrae is achieved without harming nearby muscles and tissues when using minimally invasive techniques.

Cervical Discectomy

Cervical is the medical term for "neck." Just as in Lumbar Discectomy, the surgeon removes a piece of damaged disc tissue in the neck area to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots.

Anterior Cervical Microdiscectomy and Fusion

Cervical microdiscectomy is a procedure on the neck using a surgical microscope and microsurgical methods. It requires a very small incision on the front of the neck to remove a ruptured or herniated disc that is putting pressure on the spinal nerve or spinal cord.

Posterior Cervical Microdiscectomy

Posterior cervical microdiscectomy requires a small incision in the middle of the back of your neck. Using a surgical microscope and microsurgical methods, your spine surgeon removes the ruptured or herniated disc that is placing pressure on the spinal nerve or spinal cord.

Anterior Cervical Microsurgical Osteophyte Removal and Fusion

Because the osteophytes or bone spurs narrow the nerve and spinal cord passageway, your spine surgeon will make a very small incision on the front of the neck to remove the disc, disc material and bone spurs.

Posterior Cervical Microforaminotomy

Posterior (from the back) cervical microforaminotomy is a procedure on the neck using a surgical microscope and microsurgical methods. It requires a small incision in the middle of your back to remove bone spur formations (osteophytes) or disc material, and thereby open the passageway for nearby nerves.

Posterior Cervical Laminectomy

Posterior (from the back) cervical laminectomy is a procedure on the neck using a surgical microscope and microsurgical methods. It requires a small incision in the middle of your neck to remove the lamina (and spinous process) to give the spinal cord more room.

Cervical Plating

A bone graft provides spinal support and gradually fuses or joins with vertebrae above and below it. In some cases, added stabilization is required.

Lumbar Microforaminatomy

With the aid of a microscope, the surgeon removes a part of the lamina (bone) covering the spinal canal in order to access a herniated disc.

Lumbar Laminectomy

Removal of part or all of the bone covering the spinal canal in order to free nerve roots, remove tumor, infection, or to perform certain types of fusion procedures.

Lumbar Microdiscectomy

With the aid of a microscope, the surgeon removes the herniated disc.

MicroEndoscopic Discectomy

With the aid of a probe calledn an endoscope, the surgeon removes the herniated disc.

Lumbar Fusion

Sometimes by removing a herniated disc, the vertebrae may become unstable and may be a source for future problems. A fusion may be required to stabilize the vertebrae and restore the disc space. The surgeon may use threaded dowels to accomplish this result.

Rhizotomy

Rhizotomy is where the physician may use heat or cold to intentionally hinder the ability of a problematic nerve to telegraph pain signals to the brain. While pain signals serve a purpose, to warn us about danger or injury, sometimes a nerve can end up in a "stuck" position, sending a continuous pain signal to the brain for no apparent reason..

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Rapid City, SD 57701

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